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U.S. immigration law
   

  Non Immigrant Visas
 
  Immigrant Visas
 
  Naturalization
 
  Employer I-9 Compliance
 
  Asylum
 
  Litigation


  Practice Areas

Non Immigrant Visas (Temporary Visas)
A non immigrant visa is for a foreign national who seeks temporary entry to the United States for a specific purpose. The foreign national must have a permanent residence abroad (for most classes of admission) and qualify for the non immigrant classification sought. The non immigrant classifications include: foreign government officials, visitors for business and for pleasure, aliens in transit through the United States, treaty traders and investors, students, international representatives, temporary workers and trainees, representatives of foreign information media, exchange visitors, fiance of U.S. citizens, intracompany transferees, NATO officials, religious workers, and some others. Most non immigrants can be accompanied or joined by spouses and unmarried minor (or dependent) children.

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Immigrant Visas
An immigrant visa is a visa that allows a foreign national to come to live and work in the United States permanently. When he/she arrives at the port of entry and gives the immigrant visa to the inspector of the Customs and Border Protector (CBP) officer, he/she then becomes a legal permanent resident which is symbolized by the green card. There are two major ways to get the immigrant visa. One is through a family relationship to a US citizen or someone else who is already a permanent resident; the other is through employment or investment in the United States.

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Naturalization
A citizen of the United States is a native-born, foreign-born, or naturalized person who owes allegiance to the United States and who is entitled to its protection. In addition to the naturalization process, the United States recognizes the U.S. citizenship of individuals according to two fundamental principles: jus soli, or right of birthplace, and jus sanguinis, or right of blood.

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Employer I-9 Compliance
Employers are required to have an Employment Eligibility Verification Form (Form I-9) on file for all employees, including U.S. citizens, hired after November 6, 1986. Mistakes on I-9 compliance committed by employers can result on fines for paperwork and employment violations. Criminal penalties can apply for a "pattern or practice" of hiring unauthorized aliens.

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Asylum
Any individual who is physically present in the United States, irrespective of status, may receive asylum if he or she timely files an application and qualifies as a refugee. To qualify the applicant will prove being a person outside his or her country of nationality who is unable or unwilling to return to, and is unable or unwilling to avail him or herself of the protection of that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality and membership in any particular social group or political opinion.

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Litigation
Increasingly, immigration practitioners and foreign nationals seeking benefits from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) face long delays in application processing. In some instances these delays become unreasonable and can add up to years over the advised processing times quoted by USCIS. In the case of an unreasonable delay, it may ultimately be necessary to bring a civil action against government agencies. The Fleischer Law Firm can help you sue the goverment to help expedite your immigration case.

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Nothing on this site should be construed as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is general content only, and should
not be relied upon for any specific information. For specific legal advice consult an experienced immigration attorney.